How to Make the Most of Google’s Dynamic AdWords

If you want to go from zero to 60 with Google AdWords, setting up a Dynamic Ad Campaign is a great way to do so. Since 2014, AdWords has offered the “Dynamic Ads” feature for search. Here’s how it works:

  1. Using the AdWords campaign builder, input the URL of your website (or a specific page of your site) where you’d like to drive search traffic.
  2. Write an 80-character description line.
  3. Google will analyze the copy and automatically bid on keywords relevant to the pages on your site.

That’s it.

When a customer searches for a related term, Google will instantly write an ad based on the web copy that’s relevant to the search term. Per Google’s description, if someone searches for “luxury hotel New York,” they might see an add with the headline, “Luxury hotel – NYC.”

It’s a great way to get started on AdWords with minimal management work, and it comes with additional benefits as well. If you had instead set up a traditional ad group and manual keyword selection for hotels, someone searching for a New York City hotel might just see a more generic ad for “luxury hotels” and miss out on the valuable detail—New York City—in the search term.

Use What You Learn from Dynamic Ads to Guide Manual Bid Strategies

Insights gained through dynamic ads have been tremendously valuable for our clients’ B2B AdWords campaigns. First, the specificity of the dynamic title raises clickthrough rates. Searchers are more likely to find your ad relevant if it’s tailored exactly to their query.

Second, dynamic ads have helped us discover search-term paths that we weren’t utilizing in other campaigns. When you set up a dynamic ad campaign, search results are determined by a website’s copy, not manually selected terms. So instead of going through the process of keyword mapping, the list of actual terms users search to get to your site is generated automatically by Google.

Some terms that pop up in accounts where we’re utilizing dynamic ads aren’t surprising. The name of the company and brand names are common. However, we’ve also found that dynamic ads will generate clicks on terms we hadn’t thought to bid on, such as blogs on trade show attendance, which we might not have otherwise included in our manual selection.

Dynamic Isn’t Working? Try SKAGs

Dynamic ad campaigns won’t be optimal for every site or company. If you already have a robust ad campaign, and bid on many keywords, your dynamic search ads won’t show when someone searches for an eligible exact-match term in your account.

So, if you have an extensive AdWords program already underway, you might not get the full benefit of a dynamic campaign, particularly if you are bidding on a lot of keywords. Dynamic ads may not do the trick if your goal is to drive traffic to a niche site with fewer common keyword pathways.

If that’s the case, then you can still get the benefit of custom ads for specific keywords by using Single Keyword Ad Groups (SKAGs). With this method, writing a single ad for a single keyword in one ad group will produce the same effect as a dynamic ad. If keywords are very similar to each other, having a few keywords in an ad group can produce the same effect.

For example, when we bid on the key term “best creative agencies in Minneapolis” and put the keyword into a single ad group, we’ll write ad copy like: “Best Minneapolis Creative Agency—Strother Communications Group”. Thus, a searcher will see an ad tailored perfectly to their search.

Google AdWords can be intimidating for beginners, but the truth is that the tool gives you lots of ways to optimize your results. Need help figuring out the best strategy for your company? Get in touch.

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Ryan Strother

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